Know How To Give Your Pets CPR

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation is important to know for your pets as well as for their humans. Also, it is important to know how to effectively give the Heimlich Maneuver to your loved mascot.

Remember, these are just guidelines. You need to get your pet to the Veterinarians FAST. Do CPR on the way but get the animal to a vet.

This is a great poster from The American Red Cross to print out and keep it handy just in case you ever need the information in an emergency.

American Red Cross information on Saving a Pet With CPR

American Red Cross information on Saving a Pet With CPR

“Before performing this procedure please keep in mind that Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation is hazardous and can cause physical complications or fatal damage if performed on a healthy dog. It should only be performed when necessary.” CPR for Dogs as written on http://www.petmd.com/dog/emergency/common-emergencies/e_dg_cardiopulmonary_resuscitation

The ASPCA says
“CPR may be necessary if you remove the object your dog is choking on, but he is still unconscious.
*First check to see if he’s breathing.
*If not, place him on his side and perform artificial respiration by extending his head and neck, holding his jaws closed and blowing into his nostrils once every three seconds. (Ensure no air escapes between your mouth and the dog’s nose.)
*If you do not feel a heartbeat, incorporate cardiac massage while administering artificial respiration—three quick, firm chest compressions for every respiration—until your dog resumes breathing on his own.”
http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/dog-care/emergency-care

*If there is no breathing and no pulse give CPR. Remember do not give CPR if you feel a pulse.
*Chest Compressions on a pet under 90 pounds is 5 compressions to one breath over 90 pounds is 10 chest compressions to 1 breath. *The breaths are done with the animals mouth closed and breathing into the nose in a small animal you can just cover the mouth and nose completely with your mouth.
*Breath easily with small animals and harder with large ones until you see the chest rise.
*Lay the animal with the right side down because the heart is located on the left side.
*Place the hands over the ribs where the elbow touches the chest to do compressions.
*Check for pulse after 1 minute.
*Continue giving CPR until the animal has a pulse and is breathing.

How to check for a pulse in a dog of cat
*Remember do not use your thumb to check for a pulse
*Hands low on the chest, near the elbow joint, and feel the heart beats.
*High on the inner side of the thigh is the femoral artery. Place two fingers on the middle of the thigh near where the leg joins the body. The femoral pulse can be very difficult to feel in cats.
http://www.petsadviser.com/pet-health/how-take-your-dog-cats-pulse/

Very good video of Veterinarian Karen Halligan, DVM, of the American Red Cross’ Los Angeles Chapter gives an in-depth tutorial on how you can safely perform animal CPR and Heimlich Maneuver in an emergency situation.

This post is approved by Teli.

This post approved by Teli, The Dominican Dog

This post approved by Teli, The Dominican Dog

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Lola – A Very Sad Local Dog

This is Lola. My mom likes to name the dogs she likes so that they feel like they are loved and someone looks out for them. She originally called this girl Susi but yesterday we were told Lola is the name all her neighbors call her.

Lola lives in the San Anton section of Colonial Zone

Lola lives in the San Anton section of Colonial Zone

Lola has a very sad story. This is what we were told. Lola had a home of her own but her family up and moved to Barahona and left her behind. She did nothing wrong. They just did not want to take her with them when they moved. They did not think of her at all. They did not try and find her a home. One day she had someone and the next she was in the street alone. Bad, bad humans!

There was a German lady that started feeding her and making sure Lola had her vaccinations. The neighbors said they have never seen her pregnant or with puppies so maybe she is sterilized. The time came for the German lady to return to her own country. Lola was abandoned for the second time leaving her in the street. At least the neighbors make sure she has food.

Just look at her eyes. She is so sad. Look at her tail. She is so afraid. My mom sat with her and pet her. She loved being pet. She wants affection. She is very frightened and dirty. I bet she would love to have a house of her own. One where no one would abandon her again. One where she could feel safe and share all the love she has to offer with her very own humans.

Teli and Buenagente checking out Lola at Plaza San Anton.

Teli and Buenagente checking out Lola at Plaza San Anton.

When the man told us Lolas’ story my mom cried. I know my mom would love to take Lola into our home but we live is a small Studio Apartment and have no space or cash for another dog. Maybe you might want to give her love or know someone that would give Lola a good safe home.

She so deserves a loving family to look after after all the abandonment and loss she has had in her life.

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Abeja – A Loved Local Dog

This is Abeja (Bee in English). (My mom likes to name the dogs she likes so that they feel like they are loved and someone looks out for them.) Abeja is a little dog that lives in the streets of the Colonial Zone. The locals call these street dogs Viralatas.

Abeja, a Street Dog, lives in Parque Colon in Zona Colonial.

Abeja, a Street Dog, lives in Parque Colon in Zona Colonial.

Abeja is a female and lives in Parque Colon, Zona Colonial most of the time. She can also be seen wandering up and down Calle el Conde. On the Map of Colonial Zone is it number 49 and 8.

Abeja in Parque Colon.

Abeja in Parque Colon.

Abeja is very friendly. She loves it when my mom pets her. She puts her paws right up on my moms legs to get as close as she can. She also loves her tummy scratched. It looks like maybe she has had babies once, poor girl. She is a small – large dog (if that makes sense because she is a small sized dog but on the large end but not big enough to be considered as a medium sized dog, get it?). She as really pretty eyes that are a sort of green color. She has a scratch on her side that is almost healed. It was pretty bad when she got in but she tended to it well.

Abejas boo-boo

Abejas boo-boo

Abeja lives in the street but my mom and I both think she would make someone a very nice house dog. She is so loving and friendly. She seems to be young so I am sure she can be easily trained. She is a little bit thin but I am sure she would fill out in no time with some good food and lots of love. My mom said if she could she would bring this dog home. My mom would bring all the dogs home if she had room.

Abeja getting some mommy loving

Abeja getting some mommy loving

If you would like to donate to help the Street Dogs of the Colonial Zone with medicine and sterilization let me know or visit the PADELA FaceBook page. Go to the ABOUT section and there is information on how to make a donation. Make sure to state it is for The Dogs of Colonial Zone or Los perros de la Zona Colonial. We are trying to raise money to take care of our local Viralatas.

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Zippy – A Loved Local Dog

This is Zippy. (My mom likes to name the dogs she likes so that they feel like they are loved and someone looks out for them.) Zippy is a good friend of mine. She lives in the streets of the Colonial Zone. The locals call these street dogs Viralatas.

Zippy relaxing in the Colmado

Zippy relaxing in the Colmado

Zippy lives in the Plaza Bartolomé de las Casas where they have the Arts and Crafts Fair. On the Map of Colonial Zone is it number 60. The people there take care of Zippy as do other neighbors in the area. Zippy also hangs out on the corner of Calle Meriño and Arz. Portes where she likes to visit the Colmados.

Zippy playing with Buenagente and I. Zippy is in the middle with the big ears.

Zippy playing with Buenagente and I. Zippy is in the middle with the big ears.

Zippy is very friendly and loves to run around. She usually always has a stick, bone, ball or whatever toy she can find hanging out of her mouth. She loves to play. If you see Zippy make sure to say hi to her. She is very sweet.

Zippy playing with friends

Zippy playing with friends

Zippy is what I would call a red colored dog. She has big ears that are usually up and alert at all times. She is friendly but hates to be held or on a leash. She will cry like a little baby if you try and trap her. She loves to follow me and my friends around and pretty much does as we tell her. Zippy is sterilized and is up to date on her shots thanks to PADELA.

Zippy close-up

Zippy close-up

If you would like to donate to help the Street Dogs of the Colonial Zone with medicine and sterilization let me know or visit the PADELA FaceBook page. Go to the ABOUT section and there is information on how to make a donation. Make sure to state it is for The Dogs of Colonial Zone or Los perros de la Zona Colonial. We are trying to raise money to take care of our local Viralatas.

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Bruiser – A Loved Local Dog

This is Bruiser. (My mom likes to name the dogs she likes so that they feel like they are loved and someone looks out for them.) He is a good friend of mine. He lives in the streets of the Colonial Zone. The locals call these street dogs Viralatas. He looks frightening but really he is very friendly and loves when humans pet him and show him a little attention.

Bruiser - A beautiful street dog of the Zona Colonial

Bruiser – A beautiful street dog of the Zona Colonial

Bruiser has a harem that follows him around and that he cares for. He is not daddy to any of these ladies puppies because Bruiser is castrated. He is also up to date on his vaccinations thanks to PADELA.

Bruiser and his Harem - Ojo, Lady and Mia at the Ruinas del Monasterio de San Francisco, Parque de las Palomas

Bruiser and his Harem – Ojo, Lady and Mia at the Ruinas del Monasterio de San Francisco, Parque de las Palomas

Bruiser lives at the Ruinas del Monasterio de San Francisco and the Parque de las Palomas in the Colonial Zone. On the Map of Colonial Zone is it number 16 and 17.

Bruiser at the Parque de las Palomas

Bruiser at the Parque de las Palomas

If you see him or his girls be nice to him. He did not chose to live in the streets. He is not a bad dog. He just had some bad luck that he did not find someone to love and care for him in their home. Give him a pat and a little food if you see him.

Bruisers Close-Up

Bruisers Close-Up

If you would like to donate to help the Street Dogs of the Colonial Zone with medicine and sterilization let me know or visit the PADELA FaceBook page. Go to the ABOUT section and there is information on how to make a donation. Make sure to state it is for The Dogs of Colonial Zone or Los perros de la Zona Colonial. We are trying to raise money to take care of our local Viralatas.

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